1S5 Ferguson tensions / reactions + revisions

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 19.31.34Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 19.32.51MIND MAPS groupwork Wednesday, December 3rd

2014-12-04 21.57.35CCL: It’s hard not to have an opinion on this event. Even the TV news channels which are supposed dto be unbiased / neutral end up voicing their opinions.

Also, social media are hiding behind the fact that they stand for free speech to allow racist comments to spread on their forums and platforms. This is really shocking / horrendous. It highlights the fact that racism is still rampant in the US today.

Racial tensions in America today remind us of past events, they echo tragic events and segregation. It’s as if the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King, Rosa Parks … didn’t exist. 

Revise:

Passive voice

UNIT 2 – FULL DOCS : LESSON NOTES

EX of REVISONS MEMO

Rosa Parks (RP) > in 1955 / refused to give up her seat > was arrested

> started the MontGomery Bus Boycott / led by MLK (26 y o)

Claudette Colvin ? > same as RP / she refused to give up her seat

BUT B4 RP & not famous Bcoz > teenager & bad reputa° (pregnant) / bad image for NAACP activist group in civil rights movement (created by MLK & Black lobby 2day)

LITTLE ROCk 9

1957

after school segrega° ended in 1954 (Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Ruling)

9 studts allowed in white-only school.

> demonstrations / white racist violence

heroes / heroines

  • desegrega° bus / schools was a slow / complicated process
  • famous heroes like MLK / Rosa Parks were not alone /

    ‘footsoldiers’ of the civil rights movement (Claudette Colvin, Carlotta, Elizabeth…)

  • kids & women ‘unsung’ ‘unexpected’ heroes

TODAY

Michael Brown vs Wilson > tensions in Ferguson

< Echo from the past / segregation / racism still exists / racial profiling by white police forces same as national guard vs. Claudette Colvin in 1957.

DATES & CONTEXT

1865- Lincoln abolished slavery

1896 – Plessy Vs Ferguson = ‘Separate but Equal’ concept / segregation is legal

1950s – 1960s = Civil Rights Movement (Mvt pr obten° droits civiques (vote, equal pay, equal educa°) / fin discriminations raciales)

1954 – Brown Vs Board of Education = End of segregation in schools.

1964 – Civil Rights Act/ End of Civil Rights movement

STUDY QUESTIONS

> Mexico 68 > Black Power demonstration / symbols and reactions. / iconic protests signs

> We always speak about MLK / Rosa Parks but were they alone? Role of Claudette Colvin / Elizabeth Eckford / kids & women in Civil Rights Movement

> The End of Segregation in school is official since 1954 but what happens in former white-only schools for Black people? Little Rock 9

> Tensions in Ferguson today > sparks nationwide concern for racial discriminations in the US today / is racism replacing segregation?

CCL

Carlotta Wallis, Elizabeth Eckford, Claudette Colvin are ‘unexpected‘ heroines because they were teenagers, girls and Black so they were strong minded and very brave but they are not remembered by history books, they are not as famous as Martin Luther King or Rosa Parks, they are ‘unsung’ (‘ne sont pas louées, célébrées, chantées.) Yet (pourtant) they set the example for Black generations, they were the foot soldiers of the bus boycott and they have to be remembered! The battle for school integration and desegregation was a very slow, difficult and complicated process. Mentalities didn’t change as fast as the laws. The situation for Black people didn’t change overnight. This event is important because the national guard was present and it echoes racial tensions happening today in Ferguson.

BAC NOTIONS

Myths and Heroes

Carlotta and Elizabeth didn’t plan their actions, they are both ‘unexpected’ heroines because they are ordinary school girls but their acts of defiance shows bravery and courage. So they are role models and they illustrate the heroic role of kids and women in the fight for equal rights.

The Idea of Progress

The Little Rock Nine story also shows how slow social progress can be. Even if laws were changed (1954 end of school segregation), people still had to fight for their rights and for mentalities to change.

Places and Forms of Power

The determination and courage of a group of teenagers challenged the established order of a white-only school. It shows that kids and women can win the fight for equality. Individuals, ordinary citizens can be more powerful than local guards and authorities.

 

This is really shocking / horrendous. It highlights the fact that racism is still rampant in the US today.

1S5 November 26th THE COLOR LINE : TENSIONS IN FERGUSON

RACIAL TENSIONS IN FERGUSON THIS WEEK!

On Monday this week in the US, In Ferguson, Missouri there were demonstrations / people demonstrated because they were angry at the Grand Jury’s decision. The police officer who killed / shot a black teenager in August wasn’t indicted / charged / trialled / or found guilty.

The Black community in Ferguson needs more details / answers and justice for Michael Brown. They want Darren Wilson to be trialled / tried  so he can proove his guilt or innocence. Some people think a racist white police officer killed an innocent Black teenager so he should be arrested / trialled /  tried  / found guilty. They want Darren Wilson to be arrested because he killed Michael Brown.

But the Grand Jury decided not to indict him / he wasn’t indicted / charged with murder. There wasn’t enough evidence to open a trial case. The investigation was supervised by the prosecutor.

an investigation: une enquête

to be trialled / tried: comparaître devant les juges.

Screen Shot 2014-11-29 at 13.57.55Screen Shot 2014-11-29 at 13.59.58

HW – Due on Monday –  20141121_193013Little Rock 9 Crisis Q 1 to 3 /

HW – Due on Wednesday – Tensions in Ferguson Q 1 to 5

Screen Shot 2014-11-29 at 13.41.21

1L TENSIONS IN FERGUSON Session 1 & 2

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 23.31.37

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT?

I guess…

Maybe …

I suppose …

Watch the video!

1- What strikes you the most? Event / Image / Person? Why?

2- What key events are covered?

3- Which news is the most important? Why?

4- Does is correspond to the first images shown?

5- What do you think the following words mean? Explain with images and words!

looting

grand jury

not indicted

6- How many points of view are expressed? Explain. 

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 22.25.29Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 22.25.21Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 21.59.52Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 22.25.50

HW

CO – TENSIONS IN FERGUSON AS THE GRAND JURY DECIDES NOT TO INDICT* DARREN WILSON FOR THE SHOOTING OF MICHAEL BROWN

WATCH THE FOLLOWING VIDEOS AND READ THE TRANSCRIPTS.

a- What is Jake Tapper’s job? Which channel does he work for?

b- Where is he? Why?

c- What do you think will happen next?

d- What’s his opinion of the situation? Is he biased?

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2014/08/19/jake_tapper_nothing_is_going_on_that_merits_this_scene_out_of_bagram.html

  • to indict so. : mettre qq’un en examen

  • an indictment : une mise en examen

  • biased: subjectif

Transcript: CNN’s Jake Tapper

I want to show you this, okay? To give you an idea of what’s going on. The protesters have moved all the way down there… they’re all the way down there. Nobody is threatening anything. Nobody is doing anything. None of the stores here that I can see are being looted*. There is no violence.

Now I want you to look at what is going on in Ferguson, Missouri, in downtown America, okay? These are armed police, with — not machine guns — semi-automatic rifles, with batons, with shields, many of them dressed for combat. Now why they’re doing this? I don’t know. Because there is no threat going on here. None that merits this. There is none, okay? Absolutely there have been looters*, absolutely over the last nine days there’s been violence, but there is nothing going on on this street right now that merits this scene out of Bagram. Nothing. So if people wonder why the people of Ferguson, Missouri are so upset*, this is part of the reason. What is this? This doesn’t make any sense.

* to loot: vandaliser

* looters : vandales

* upset: troubled

a- What is the source of this video? What sources are used in this video? Are they reliable?

b- Who is Darren Wilson? Do you think he is guilty?

c- What is he explaining? How does he portray Michael Brown?

d- Did you opinion of Darren Wilson and Michael Brown change after watching this video? Why?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGANaLWaWQo

Transcript:

You’re gonna hear Darren Wilson’s testimony* as he gave it to the FBI agents for the first time. Alright, let’s begin and it starts with the /an FBI agent and he says : “how is he assaulting* you?” and then Darren Wilson says “ the first time he had struck* me somewhere in this area but it was like a glancing blow cause I was able to defend a little bit hum… after that he / I was doing just a scrambling trying to get his arms out of my face and him from grabbing me and everything else. I thought I was already compromised enough. I drew my firearm, I pointed at him STOP I’m going to shoot you is what I ordered him to get on the ground. He said “you too…” we gonna redact that and we’re gonna go on when he says “He grabbed my gun, he twisted it, pointed it at me into my hip and my pelvic area.”

This is the moment when officer Wilson says he gets out of the car. He’s telling the FBI “I exited, I followed him in that direction” and that would be away from the car “after I said to the radio ‘shots fired, send more car’. I was yelling at him to stop and get on the ground “ and now keep in mind he has already said he has already shot. These are now more shots to come. He kept running and then eventually he stopped in this area, somewhere, when he stopped he turned looked at me, made like a groining noise and had a most intense aggressive face I’ve seen on a person.”

* testimony : témoignage

* to assault: attaquer

* to strike (past – struck): frapper / cogner

LESSON  NOTES

Session 1 – Wednesday, Novembre 26th.

2014-11-26 09.08.58

2014-11-28 10.16.34Clara as the prosecutor / Lauriane as Michael Brown / Inès as an angry demonstrator / Laurine as a peaceful demonstrator / Anaïs as Darren Wilson / Julia as a racist supporter / Sophie as a journalist / Eireann as a spokewoman for a Human Rights association. / Mélanie as Barack Obama

2014-11-28 09.52.26 2014-11-28 09.52.142014-11-28 10.16.34

1S5 November 24th- Lesson Notes

November 24th, 2014.

HW for Wednesday 26th

Read the text ‘Little Rock Nine Crisis’ + find vocab and be ready for teamwork!

20141121_193013

UNIT 2 – THE COLOR LINE

>> The role of women in the struggle for equality.

HW – CO. NPR Claudette Colvin, the other Rosa Parks.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=101719889

Claudette Colvin

  • She refused to give up her seat to a white passenger 9 months before Rosa Parks.

Compared to Rosa Parks?

  • They both challenged the segregation laws.
  • They were both African American women in Montgomery, Alabama in the South of the US.

BUT

  • Claudette Colvin was only 15 / a teenager whereas R. P was 26 / a young woman.
  • Rosa Parks is more famous than Claudette Colvin because Claudette Colvin got pregnant so the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) refused to use her image.

Inspired by?

  • She was inspired by Harriet Tubman (who was a runaway slave in the Underground Railway ) and Sojourner Truth who was a former slave and became an abolitionist. Both were women fighting for the Black cause / because they also stood up / fought for their rights.

Media strategies?

  • NAACP needed to choose a respectable woman as a symbol for their cause. They were manipulating / orchestrating their media strategy in order to be successful.

Segregation anecdote?

  • Black people couldn’t try on clothes because white people during segregation thought black people were not clean / pure. They assumed they were dirty.

Philip Hoose?

  • Philip Hoose is an American writer / historian who wanted to write about Claudette because:
  • he knew about segregation / he did some research
  • he wanted Claudette to become as famous as Rosa Parks

Conclusion?

  • It reveals that Rosa Parks wasn’t the only woman to refuse to give up her seat / who stood up for her rights. In fact there were many women who took part in the struggle for equality, some of them are ‘unsung’ or ‘unexpected’ (oubliées ou inattendues).

Whereas = tandis que

both: toutes les deuxScreen Shot 2014-11-16 at 21.48.53

CO – Correction / NPR – One of the Little Rock Nine Looks Back!

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14091050

Little Rock = city in Arkansas in the US.

Little Rock High School = former / previously white-only school.

The ‘Little Rock Nine’ = first 9 Black students to attend Little Rock High School in the town of Little Rock in Arkansas.

METHOD

1- KEY WORDS

  • infer the meaning from the title (inférence / devinette). What do you expect?
  • focus on stressed words

Type of doc & voices > report / interview 1 presenter / 1 reporter 1 governor 1 old woman

WHEN 1957 – September 4th – 50 years ago

WHERE Arkansas – high school

WHO Elizabeth – 65 – Black – White – governor – guard – demonstrators – 9 Black students

WHAT racial – segregation – integration – attend school – outside – turned away

2 – DETAILS

  • Get organized
  • Focus on more difficult words or info.

About Elizabeth? White clothes – sunglasses – outside … – nightmare

About the people? White students – governor – good order – peace in the community

About the context? Desegregation – recording – E’s account 50 years after the event

About the anecdote? Elizabeth was supposed to go with the group but there was confusion and she took a city bus alone so she was stopped / turned away by the guard and ‘subsequently followed by angry demonstrators’

3- COHERENCE AND MORE

  • reconstruct the chronology / logic of events

radio show > context given by presenter > Alex / journalist & reporter is going to talk about 1 of the 9 students > recording of Arkansas governor / bad quality > interview of Elizabeth > journalist’s comments

  • WHY ? HOW? WHAT FOR?
  • Find the people’s reactions > feelings / intentions

Elizabeth is moved / sad / it’s difficult for her to tell about what happened

The governor wanted peace but he sparkled an emergency situation. The guard was here to protect the Black students but in the end they turned Elizabeth away.

The radio show is celebration the 50 anniversary of this event, 50 years later in a special ‘desegregation series’.

TSTMG HW One of the Little Rock Nine Looks Back

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14091050

UNIT 2 – The Color Line

Session 3 : Little Rock Nine / Read & React.

Listen to One of the Little Rock Nine Looks Back.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14091050

1- Look at the title and dates of this document. Why did they decide to speak about the Little Rock Nine?

2- Match each name with the correct occupation:

guide – student – governor – reporter

ALEX CHADWICK – ORVAL FAUBUS – ELIZABETH ECKFORD – KRYSTAL MERCER

3- Which picture is referred to? Why? Pick out words you hear.

Screen Shot 2014-11-16 at 21.48.53 African American students arriving at high school  in U.S. Army car LittleRockNineLeaveCentralHigh

4- What happened to Elizabeth? Why?

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5- How does she feel now?

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TSTMG Revisions + We’re having a racist moment!

TEAMWORK
Unit 2 – THE COLOR LINE

HW Test on Friday Revise on beeoclock.wordpress.com
Be ready for lesson quiz / vocab / 10 + listening comprehension / 10.

a- Answer and present!
b- Take notes!

TEAM 1- Abolition of Slavery?
When? ………………………………………………..……………………………………………………………..
What is slavery? ………………………………………………..………………………………………………..
TEAM 2- Segregation in the US?
When did it end? ………………………………………………..………………………………………………..
What is segregation? ………………………………………………..…………………………………………..
TEAM 3- Rosa Parks?
What did she do? ………………………………………………..………………………………………………..
When?………………………………………………..……………………………………………………………….
TEAM 4- Martin Luther King ?
What did he do? ………………………………………………..………………………………………………..
When?………………………………………………..………………………………………………………………
TEAM 5- Malcolm X
What did he do?………………………………………………..………………………………………………..
When? ………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………….
TEAM 6- Obama?
Who? ………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………….
When was he elected? ………………………………………………..…………………………………….

KEY VOCABULARY!














UNIT 2 – THE COLOR LINE
Listening Comprehension

LOOK AT THE IMAGE AND GUESS! What do you expect?

I think … Maybe … I suppose…

Listen and react!

1- Watch the video and create 2 questions.
TEAM 1-
a- TYPE / DOC ………………………………………………..……………………………………………………………. ?
b- WHO / SPEAK ………………………………………………..………………………………………………………… ?
TEAM 2-
a- WHAT / ABOUT ………………………………………………..………………………………………………………… ?
b- DO / HOW MANY / ANECDOTES / TELL ABOUT / SHE ……………………………………………….………………………………………………………… ?
TEAM 3-
a- WHEN / HAPPEN / IT / DO ………………………………………………………………………………………… ?
b- WHERE / HAPPEN / DO ……………………………………………………………………………………………. ?
TEAM 4-
a- WHAT / SHE / SEE / DO ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ?
b- HOW / PEOPLE / REACT / DO ……………………………………………………………………………………. ?
TEAM 5-
a- DO x 2 WHAT / SHE / DECIDE / TO / …………………………………………………………………………… ?
b- WHY / DO x2 / SHE / THAT ……….…………………………………………………………………………… ?

TEAM 6-
a- WHAT / DO / SEE / THEY ……………………………………………………………………………………………… ?
b- WHAT / THEY / REALIZE / DO ………………………………………………………………………………………… ?
2- Watch again and take notes.

3- Ask the opposite team your question.

4- Listen, take notes and recap’ !

KEY VOCABULARY!